Tips for Incoming New Students (or, Mistakes I’ve Made Over the Past Three Years)

By Cheryl Yau '19 As one of the Head Mentors for the International Student Mentor Program (ISMP), I have had the opportunity to interact with many new students. Questions I’m often asked include: what would you have done differently? What do you wish you had known as a new student? Unsurprisingly, there are many things I wish someone had told me, and, with that, here is Cher...
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Studying Abroad … Again?

By Cheryl Yau '19 31 Dec 2017. I board an almost empty plane at Changi Airport, Singapore. Strike of midnight, and I am in transit at Doha Airport, Qatar. 1 Jan 2018. Here I am, in Cape Town, South Africa. I exit immigration to find a little crowd waiting for me—our (brilliant) program coordinator, Pieter, and some of the other students on the program who've arrived s...
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A Man in Amman

By Ethen Lund '19 [Ethen studied abroad in Amman, Jordan on the SIT Jordan: Refugees, Health, and Humanitarian Action Program] In Arabic, the name of this city is one character different than the word for safe. This coincidence holds credence in that the people of Amman are overwhelmingly benevolent. Crime is an afterthought, as the government and population take great pr...
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Oceanía Es un Continente?

By Sarah Binau '19 I was in my Spanish class at the public university (La Universidad de Chile) in Santiago, the sprawling, smoggy city at the foot of the Andes in the noodle-like country of Chile. Our professor, Claudia, paused during the lesson and remarked that our class had representatives from every continent. My classmates were a global mix: Brazilian, Japanese, Portug...
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You Do Not Know What You Do Not Know

By Cheryl Yau '19 A key aspect of a liberal arts education that I really relish is the serendipitous exposure to ideas and people I would have not actively sought out on my own. In my very first semester at college, I registered for a class that I thought was titled “Violence, Media and Transnational Justice.” I later found out during the first class that I had misread the c...
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From the Acropolis to the Athens Lawn Tennis Club: Being a Student Athlete Abroad

By Arianna Chen '19 Tennis has always been a constant in my life and it shows. I'm pretty sure some people have only seen me in athletic wear and think that my tennis rackets are permanently glued to my hands like Thor and his hammer. Being a student-athlete has inevitably been central to my identity. My desire to study abroad has also been a constant in my life-the abili...
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Where Rory Taylor Interviews Jack Buyske and Learns about Claremont Pizza Culture

Jack and Rory eating
by Rory Taylor '18 This week I sat down with Jack Buyske, a rising senior at Pomona, to talk about all manner of topics. A Public Policy Analysis major, Jack is on track to head off to medical school after he graduates. Our conversation ranged from the fierceness of the Sagehen mascot to his experience in the college process. Jack, first welcome, but just really quickly w...
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Studying Abroad in Melbourne, Australia: The Finale

I sit here on my couch in my new Sontag suite, back on Pomona's campus, stumped as I try to organize my thoughts into a sort of summary of my experiences abroad in Melbourne. Should I mention the differences between our cultures? The prevalence of amazing Chinese and Thai restaurants? The various hilarious, crazy, and fascinating interactions with people from all over the world...
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Why I Actually Studied Abroad

Over the Seine
Hi everyone! Maybe it’s the winter weather, or my fear of losing track of my thoughts, but I finally managed to huddle inside and finish writing this post. Here it is: the “Why I Studied Abroad” post that you’ve been waiting for. Kind of. Back in August, before I left Vermont for Paris, I jotted down a few questions in my very first post. Questions like: What will I learn ab...
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Saving Money While Abroad

Baguette
Hi, everyone! Today, I’m writing from a cozy coffee shop in the 10th arrondissement. Yes, Paris is slowly coming around to the idea of coffee shops, though café terraces are still, and will always be, the norm. I’ve been thinking a lot lately about money’s role in study abroad, especially as I stare at the €5 drinks being offered at this particular coffee shop. As a complement ...
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