Why a Liberal Arts Education Is Like a Thali

Vids and friends arm-in-arm, smiling
By Vidusshi Hingad '25 A liberal arts education is like a thali. I promise you this analogy makes sense—just stick with me! Just like the thali is a large plate in which a plethora of dishes are served, a liberal arts education is like tasting different flavors of areas of knowledge which eventually develop your taste buds to their maximum potential. [At Pomona] you are requ...
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Mentorship at Pomona

students and staff hanging out in QSC
By Nelia Perry '24 Transitioning to college, navigating college, and transitioning out of college can be stressful, overwhelming, and confusing to manage. But you do not have to face these stages alone at Pomona! Whenever people talk about layers, they use an onion as a metaphor, so I guess I will do the same here: Pomona mentorship is like an onion; it has many layers. Thes...
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At Home

bowl of jollof rice
By Ebenezer Mensah ‘23 I walked as fast as my legs could carry me, stopping intermittently to look at my watch.  I was running late; the event was scheduled to begin in less than 10 minutes, but I had still not made any progress in locating exactly where it was supposed to take place. I became apprehensive and had a burst of adrenaline. Sweat formed on my brow, and my palms ...
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Taking Philosophy to the Public

screen grab of Kevin with graphics
By Kevin Hua ‘23 About two years ago I first encountered philosophy in an untraditional fashion over the Internet–it all began when a schoolmate of mine urged me to check out “a cool online philosophy course on death.” My high school in China did not have philosophy in its curriculum, but among the general public and high school students, the subject was considered lofty ...
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My Roommate and I: Two Sides of the Same Coin

palm trees
By Ebenezer Mensah ‘23 On paper, my roommate and I couldn’t be more different. He was raised in Connecticut, went to high school in Maine, and, like the quintessential American child, grew up watching superhero TV series like “Ben 10.” I, on the other hand, grew up in Sepaase, a small town in Ghana, a country in West Africa, going to farm. In simple words, we grew up worlds ...
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Using Machine Learning in Patient Diagnoses

By Ebenezer Mensah ‘23 When I was six years old, I remember walking with my father to the doctor’s office, which was in a clinic two towns from where we lived. When we reached the Afari clinic, the only nurse on duty recorded my vital symptoms, including my temperature, pulse, and blood pressure, and told us to wait for our turn. I was the 30th person in line to meet the...
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My Father’s Dreams

drone shot of Pomona campus
By Ebenezer Mensah '23 When I read my admission letter to Pomona, the first person I thought of was my father. Born a few years before Ghana gained independence, he grew up in a society where education was seen as a tool for alienating children from their traditional values. His father refused to send him to school, but his mother enrolled him at a local school. His father a...
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Sunrise at Pomona

sunset at SkySpace
By Ebenezer Mensah ‘23 Imagine this: A bright yellow sun emerging from a dark sky with soft, orange rays piercing through the windows of a small house and casting a silhouette of a young boy, sitting upright with his feet crossed, against the walls of a room in a rural town in Africa. That boy is me. I don’t remember when I started, but watching the sun rise has been an impo...
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Choose Pomona and Be Ready

Honnold Library stacks
By Ebenezer Mensah ‘23 It has been almost a year since I gained acceptance to Pomona, but I still remember reading my acceptance letter as if it happened yesterday. I still remember the shriek of laughter from my English teacher that pierced the still night when she read the letter, my teary eyes as I stared blankly at the computer screen, and the several times I spent readi...
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Need Aware Does Not Mean No Aid

By Ebenezer Mensah ‘23 On 16th February 2019, my English teacher and I huddled up around a computer in my school’s computer laboratory in Kumasi, Ghana around 1 a.m., an hour after Pomona’s admission decisions had been released. The room was dark, and the throbbing of my heart was the only sound that could be heard in the room. The internet was slow, and the portal was takin...
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